A news blog for Seattle's Phinney Ridge and Greenwood neighborhoods

 

Think & Drink at Naked City: ‘Climate Change and Civil Disobedience — How Far is Too Far?’

February 11th, 2016 by Doree

The next Humanities Washington “Think & Drink” at Naked City Brewery is set for 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb.17, and will explore “the necessity defense” by climate change activists practicing civil disobedience. Naked City is at 8564 Greenwood Ave. N. Admission is free.

In September of 2014, a group of environmental activists tried to stop climate change in its tracks. Claiming that “the Pacific Northwest is fast becoming a corridor for fossil fuel development,” five protesters blocked an oil train in Everett for over eight hours. They believed the move necessary to “avert a climate catastrophe.”

They were arrested and later tried, and at the heart of their argument was “The Necessity Defense”—the assertion that their actions, though illegal, were necessary to prevent a greater harm. At the last minute, the judge told the jury not to consider the defense, citing lack of precedent. But still the protesters, dubbed the Delta 5, were found guilty only of trespassing and they avoided jail time.

As climate change worsens, what role will civil disobedience play? How far is too far? Can lack of access to things like clean air be considered a civil right in the traditional sense? And what parallels can be drawn between the 60s Civil Rights movement and the actions of environmental protestors like the Delta 5 and “kayaktivists?”

Humanities Washington’s next Think & Drink, “The Necessity Defense: Climate Change and Civil Disobedience,” features Abby Brockway, a member of the Delta 5 and part of the environmental activist group Rising Tide Seattle; Richard Gammon, professor of oceanography and chemistry at the University of Washington; and Megan Ming Francis, assistant professor in the department of Political Science at the University of Washington and author of the award-winning book, Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State. The event will be moderated by KUOW’s environmental reporter Ashley Ahearn.

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Next Think & Drink at Naked City is ‘Seattle Skin: Being Black in a Liberal City’

November 4th, 2015 by Doree

Humanities Washington continues its fall series on difficult conversations regarding race with the next Think & Drink, called “Seattle Skin: Being Black in a Liberal City” at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 10, at Naked City Brewery, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N.

It will be moderated by Phyllis Fletcher, managing editor of Northwest News Network. Speakers are: Megan Ming Francis, assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington and author of “Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State”; Eric Davis, sociology faculty at Bellevue College and member of the UW Consulting Alliance; Eva Abram, public speaker and Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau member; and Charles Mudede, screenwriter, author and editor at The Stranger.

“I was going to tell Bernie how racist this city is, filled with its progressives, but you did it for me,” said a #BlackLivesMatter protestor while shutting down a speech in Seattle by Bernie Sanders. She then accused the audience of “white supremacist liberalism.”

Seattle is often touted as a liberal city with progressive attitudes toward race. But how much of this talk actually translates to action? Is the protestor’s experience a common one among minorities in Seattle? Seattle is the fifth whitest city in America, with a minority population of just 33%, and this relative homogeneity often keeps differing views hidden. “Seattle Skin” will reveal the experience of being black in Seattle, and explore what the city and its culture are doing right—and what needs to be changed.

This is Humanities Washington’s fifth year of Think & Drink events, which include a moderated panel discussion with audience questions and comments. Events are free but participants buy their own drinks and food.

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Think & Drink at Naked City features conversation on policing and race

October 21st, 2015 by Doree

The next Think & Drink at Naked City Brewery is at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 27. It continues the fall series discussion of race with “Black and Blue: A Conversation on Policing and Race.”

It will be moderated by Phyllis Fletcher, managing editor of Northwest News Network. Speakers include: Megan Ming Francis, assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington and author of “Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State”; and Sergeant Sean Whitcomb, Public Affairs Director at the Seattle Police Department.

In the wake of tragedies that happened in Ferguson, NYC, and Baltimore, and others, this event will spark a conversation about the frequency with which such tragedies happen, the disparity between how different minority groups are policed, and what effective policing and community relationships should look like.

This is Humanities Washington’s fifth year of Think & Drink events, which include a moderated panel discussion with audience questions and comments. Events are free but participants buy their own drinks and food. Naked City Brewery is at 8564 Greenwood Ave. N.

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Fall ‘Think & Drink’ series at Naked City starts Sept. 29, will discuss issues of race

September 23rd, 2015 by Doree

Humanities Washington’s “Think & Drink” fall series at Greenwood’s Naked City Brewery will focus on various issues of race, including the racial disparities of mass incarceration, the relationship between police and minorities, and the experience of being black in Seattle.

Recent events—#BlackLivesMatter protestors shutting down a Bernie Sanders speech, allegations of police misconduct, and rapid gentrification—have melded with national events in Ferguson and Baltimore to shake up Seattle’s conversation about race. While the word “diversity” is often used with enthusiasm in this liberal city, harder questions are starting to be asked about Seattle’s attitude and policies toward people of color.

This is Humanities Washington’s fifth year of Think & Drink events, which include a moderated panel discussion with audience questions and comments. Events are free but participants buy their own drinks and food.

The next Think & Drink is at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 29, at Naked City Brewery and Taphouse, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N. It is titled “America Behind Bars: Mass Incarceration and Civil Rights” and is moderated by Phyllis Fletcher, managing editor of Northwest News Network. Speakers include: Madeline Neighly, attorney on the Institutions Project at Columbia Legal Services; Merf Ehman, staff attorney with the Institutions Project at Columbia Legal Services; and Katherine Beckett, professor in the Department of Sociology and the Law, Societies, and Justice Program at the University of Washington.

At 2.2 million, the United States locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world, and this number has increased rapidly—500% to be exact—over just the last three decades. The issue has become so urgent that it’s one of the few problems President Obama, members of Congress, and even the Koch brothers agree needs to be solved. “America Behind Bars” will address the history behind the mass incarceration epidemic, the drug war’s influence on incarceration rates, the racial disparity between the general population and those incarcerated, and the rise of the private prison system.

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Next ‘Think & Drink’ at Naked City Brewery: ‘Earth, Interrupted: Climate Change and Geo-engineering’

June 17th, 2015 by Doree

The next Humanities WashingtonThink & Drink” is at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 23, at Naked City Brewery, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N. The topic is “Earth, Interrupted: Climate Change and Geo-engineering.”

Washington State is facing one of the worst droughts in its history, and the fire season could be unprecedented. Yet even with events like these happening with increasing frequency around the world, we still lack the political and social will to do much about them.

But there are some who say about this lack of action, “So what?” If technology has already worked so many wonders, why can’t it reduce some greenhouse emissions?

“Earth, Interrupted: Climate Change and Geo-engineering” is a moderated discussion hosted by Humanities Washington about the promise, problems, and ethical implications of using technology to intervene in the Earth’s natural systems.

Speakers: Lauren Hartzell Nichols, environmental specialist and professor of philosophy, and Thomas Ackerman, professor of atmospheric sciences at University of Washington. Moderated by Ashley Ahearn, environmental reporter at KUOW.

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Next ‘Think & Drink’ at Naked City: ‘Unveiled: Feminism, Orientalism, and Perceptions of the Middle East’

June 4th, 2015 by Doree

Humanities Washington hosts the next “Think & Drink,” in collaboration with ACT Theatre, at Naked City Brewery, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N. at 7 p.m. on Monday, June 8. The topic is “Unveiled: Feminism, Orientalism, and Perceptions of the Middle East.”

From dramatic events like the attempted murder of Malala Yousafzai to the everyday wearing of the hijab in many parts of the Middle East, the lens through which the West views Middle Eastern women is often focused on their oppression—either real or perceived. How accurate is this lens? Where do our views of the Middle East come from? And what does modern Middle Eastern feminism look like?

“Unveiled” is presented in collaboration with ACT Theatre’s production of Threesome, a play featuring two Egyptian Americans attempting to solve their relationship issues, and touching on issues of sexism, possession, and liberation. The Think & Drink event will feature award-winning playwright of Threesome Yussef El Guindi and professor of Middle Eastern Studies and Comparative Religion at The Evergreen State College Sarah Eltantawi. The discussion will be moderated by Zaki Barak Hamid, program director at Humanities Washington and Middle Eastern film instructor at Edmonds Community College.

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Former UW basketball star Donald Watts to discuss racial issues in sports at next Think & Drink

April 21st, 2015 by Doree

Humanities Washington is presenting a special Think & Drink event called “You Mad Bro?: Race and Diversity Issues in Sports” with former University of Washington basketball star Donald Watts and sociology professor Eric Davis at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 27, at Naked City Brewery, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N.

From the comments of Donald Sterling to the NCAA making huge profits from unpaid athletes, issues of race in sports have been rising to the surface of our national conversation. How should we address racial issues in sports as fans, players, organizations, and as a society? What’s it like to be a black college athlete? Do modern American sports exploit minority athletes, or do they provide a path to personal empowerment?

Watts and Davis will join moderator Tonya Mosley, a journalist with Al Jazeera, The Huffington Post, and KUOW, to discuss the wide spectrum of race in sports both on and off the field.

The event is free and open to all.

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‘Killer Cartoons,’ Tuesday’s Think & Drink at Naked City to tackle terrorism, freedom of expression

January 19th, 2015 by Doree

The next installment of Humanities Washington’s popular Think & Drink series will discuss a timely topic. “Killer Cartoons: Is the Pen Mightier Than the Sword?”with Milt Priggee, David Fenner, and KUOW’s Ross Reynolds begins at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Naked City Brewery and Taphouse, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N. Attendance is free; you just pay for your drinks and food.

The event will allow Seattle residents to come together in a casual environment to discuss and better understand issues that have emerged from the events in Paris, including freedom of expression, cultural sensitivities, and religious extremism.

Moderated by Ross Reynolds, co-host of KUOW’s The Record, the event will feature a conversation between Milt Priggee, political cartoonist, and David Fenner, an Islamic scholar and former assistant vice provost for international education at the University of Washington. Both panelists are also members of Humanities Washington’s Speakers Bureau.

The panelists will discuss the historical context behind the massacre; explore the intent of both the cartoons and the attackers; and debate the possible impact the murders will have on immigration, culture, religion, and freedom of expression. In addition to the moderated discussion, audience participation and questions are a vital part of the event.

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‘Think & Drink’ at Naked City Wednesday will focus on the history of protest

March 24th, 2014 by Doree

Humanities Washington’s next “Think & Drink” is at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Naked City Brewery & Taphouse, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N. Titled “A History of Protest: Civil Rights Movements in Seattle from the 1960s to 1980s,” the free event will explore Seattle’s role in national and international civil rights movements, including anti-apartheid, the NAACP and the Black Panther Party in our area.

The discussion will be led by Trevor Griffey, co-founder of the Seattle Civil Rights & Labor History Project and a lecturer at the University of Washington Bothell, and Eddie Rye Jr., a longtime activist and the host of the radio program Urban Forum Northwest. It will be moderated by Tonya Mosley, a broadcast reporter and regular contributor to Al Jazeera America, The Huffington Post and KUOW-FM. Mosley’s recent series for KUOW, “Black in Seattle,” sparked dialogue about race and class in Seattle.

This Think & Drink will be produced in partnership with Seattle Theatre Group and Seattle Repertory Theatre to correspond with The Suit, a parable about forgiveness set in apartheid South Africa. The Suit, a Peter Brook directed play, opens at Seattle Repertory Theatre on March 19 & runs through April 6, 2014. It will also be supported by Think & Drink’s media sponsor, KUOW, and host, Naked City Brewery & Taphouse.

Age Restrictions: You must be 21 and over to enter the main discussion room.

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