A news blog for Seattle's Phinney Ridge and Greenwood neighborhoods

 

Community names Woodland Park Zoo’s new lion cubs

January 29th, 2015 by Doree

Woodland Park Zoo’s three male lion cubs now have names, thanks to community input.

The top vote getter was Tandie, which means “fire.” Lion parents, mom Adia and dad Xerxes, were then given the chance to select two more names by being given enrichment items with the names of the next three highest vote totals. Adia stuck with the cubs while Xerxes chose Gandia, meaning “clever,” and Mandla, meaning “power/strength.”

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Photo by Dennis Dow, Woodland Park Zoo.

Tandie, Gandia and Mandla were born Oct. 24. Their outdoor schedule remains intermittent but they will come out more as warm, dry weather allows.

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Name Woodland Park Zoo’s three lion cubs

January 12th, 2015 by Doree

Woodland Park Zoo is asking the community to name its three lion cubs. The lion keeper team chose 10 names from languages that reflect parts of the South African lion’s native range.

The name with the most votes will automatically be selected as one of the cubs’ names, and the zoo will leave it to lion mother Adia and dad Xerxes to finish the job. The second, third and fourth most popular names selected by the public will be presented to the parents as enrichment choices on Thursday, January 29. Each enrichment item will be associated with a name, and the two the parents touch first will be the names of the final two cubs. Voters will also have the chance to enter a random prize drawing to win a ZooParent lion adoption.

The three lion cubs, all males, were born October 24 to mother Adia and first-time father, Xerxes. The new pride has been living in an off-view maternity den where the cubs can bond and grow in quiet surroundings. Woodland Park Zoo expects to announce the cubs’ public debut in the coming weeks. In preparation, the triplets took their first steps outdoors with Adia and Xerxes during brief practice sessions that introduced the young cubs to their spacious exhibit. Visit the zoo’s blog at bit.ly/1ACObmc for photos of the cubs’ first day outside.

You can vote for up to three names on the zoo’s website. The choices are:

  • Bokang (“Praise” or “Rejoice”)
  • Pule (“Rainy/In the rain”)
  • Tandie (“Fire”)
  • Karabo (“Answer”)
  • Letlotlo (“Treasure”)
  • Phahamo (“Eminence”)
  • Fanyana (“Little boy”)
  • Bheka (“Behold”)
  • Mandla (“Power/Strength”)
  • Gandia (“Clever”)

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Lion triplets born at Woodland Park Zoo

October 25th, 2014 by Doree

Woodland Park Zoo yesterday welcomed Africn lion triplets, born to 5-year-old Adia (ah-DEE-uh) and 7-year-old father, Xerxes. This is Xerxes’ first offspring; Adia gave birth in 2012 to four cubs with a different male.

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Photo by Dr. Darin Collins, Woodland Park Zoo.

All three of the cubs are male. The cubs and mom are bonding in the off-view maternity den.

You can see more pictures and video on the zoo’s blog.

Lion cubs typically weigh about 3 pounds at birth. They are born blind and open their eyes within a week or two after birth.

Woodland Park Zoo’s lions belong to the South African subspecies, Panthera leo krugeri. Known as the Transvaal lion, it ranges in Southern Sahara to South Africa, excluding the Congo rain forest belt, in grassy plains, savanna and open woodlands. These lions range in weight from 260 to 400 pounds.

The African lion is the only big cat not protected under the Endangered Species Act. As few as 32,000 African lions are estimated to remain in the wild and their future remains uncertain, particularly as the growth in human population continues to impact lion populations. There is legal hunting of lions and retaliation killing because they pose a threat to humans and livestock.

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4 lion cubs born at Woodland Park Zoo

November 10th, 2012 by Doree

Four lion cubs were born at Woodland Park Zoo Thursday night, the first lions born at the zoo in more than 20 years.

The lion’s den as seen from a surveillance camera above.

The mother is 3-year-old Adia; the father is 13-year-old Hubert. The genders of the cubs have not been determined.

The mom and cubs are off public exhibit in a maternity den to allow the new family to bond in a hushed, comfortable environment. Animal management staff are closely monitoring the litter via a web cam to ensure the mom is providing excellent maternal care and the cubs are properly nursing.

According to Martin Ramirez, mammal curator at Woodland Park Zoo, average litter size for lions is two to three, so this is a large litter, especially for a first-time mother. “The first 48 hours are critical, and animal care staff will be monitoring each of the cubs closely for signs of normal behavior and development over the next several weeks.”

Woodland Park Zoo’s lions belong to the South African subspecies, Panthera leo krugeri. A 13-year-old female lion, named Kalisa, also lives at the zoo’s award-winning African Savanna. Known as the Transvaal lion, it ranges in Southern Sahara to South Africa, excluding the Congo rain forest belt, in grassy plains, savanna and open woodlands. These lions range in weight from 260 to 400 pounds.

To minimize disturbance to the newborns, the other two adult lions are indoors and may not be on public exhibit throughout the weekend.

Cubs typically weigh about 3 pounds at birth. They are born blind and open their eyes within a week or two after birth.

Approximately 199 South African lions currently live in 100 AZA-accredited zoos in North America.

Adia nursing her cubs.

You can see video and photos of the cubs here.

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Zoo’s new lion will undergo quarantine exam before being introduced to African Savanna

November 29th, 2010 by Doree

Woodland Park Zoo received a 1-year-old female South African lion, named Adia, from the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium in early November. Adia has been quarantined for the standard 30 days, and will undergo a full physical on Wednesday before her quarantine is over.

Photo by Grahm Jones, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium.

Named Adia (AH-dee-uh), which means “gift” in Swahili, the new lion arrived under a recommendation by the Species Survival Plan (SSP) for African lions. She will be paired for breeding with the zoo’s 11-year-old male lion when she reaches sexual maturity next fall. After clearing quarantine, Adia will be introduced gradually to the zoo’s award-winning African Savanna where she will rotate on exhibit. The male currently lives with another female, 11 years old.

All three lions belong to the South African subspecies, Panthera leo krugeri. Known as the Transvaal lion, it ranges in Southern Sahara to South Africa, excluding the Congo rain forest belt, in grassy plains, savanna and open woodlands.

The lion is perhaps the most iconographic of all the African savanna species. Their presence on the savanna immeasurably increases eco-tourism. In zoos, they help demonstrate the interdependency of all species. Although not endangered, African lions face an uncertain future, primarily due to the growth in human population. Poachers hunt lions for trophies and because they pose a threat to humans and livestock.

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