A news blog for Seattle's Phinney Ridge and Greenwood neighborhoods

 

Reminder: Greenwood Community Council meeting tonight to discuss the future of Greenwood Town Center

March 19th, 2013 by Doree

Just a reminder that the Greenwood Community Council’s bi-monthly meeting is at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Greenwood Library, 8016 Greenwood Ave. N. On the agenda is a report from the Legislature by 36th District State Rep. Gael Tarleton, and a panel discussion about Greenwood Town Center (the area encompassing Fred Meyer, Piper Village and a few other properties.

Panelists include Seattle City Councilmember Richard Conlin; Gary Brunt of Greenwood Shopping Center; Scott Nolte, Producing Artistic Director of Taproot Theatre; and Matt Anderson, Heartland LLC.

Eight years ago the Greenwood Community Council joined with the (former) Phinney-Greenwood Chamber of Commerce, representatives from city departments, the Greenwood Shopping Center and Fred Meyer to develop a plan for Greenwood’s Town Center. It was a pro-active approach by the Community Council to develop a vision for new development, and the focus was on things that would make the Town Center more active and pedestrian-friendly, uniting the pedestrian downtown with the more car-friendly shopping center. Consultants were hired to look at the mix of businesses that could be attracted to the area, the urban form and transportation system, and their work was discussed in large public forums. The plan called for new design guidelines (since adopted), mixed use development on the shopping center site, and a walkway or street connection between downtown and the shopping center among other things.

The new Fred Meyer is completed, the first stages of Piper Village are done, a new street connecting Greenwood and the shopping center is shaping up, and the Taproot is getting ready to construct their theatre expansion. So the questions for this meeting is: What still needs to be done to make the Town Center active, walkable and economically healthy? How can the Fred Meyer be an anchor for activity throughout the Town Center that results in a better downtown Greenwood?

Comments OffTags: , , , ,

Greenwood Community Council to discuss the past and future of Greenwood Town Center next Tuesday

March 14th, 2013 by Doree

The Greenwood Community Council’s bi-monthly meeting next Tuesday, March 19, will focus on the history and future outlook of Greenwood Town Center. State Rep. Gael Tarleton, of the 36th District, also will give a report from the Legislature.

Participants on a panel discussion about Greenwood Town Center will include Seattle City Councilmember Richard Conlin; Gary Brunt of Greenwood Shopping Center; Scott Nolte, Producing Artistic Director of Taproot Theatre; and Matt Anderson, Heartland LLC.

Eight years ago the Greenwood Community Council joined with the (former) Phinney-Greenwood Chamber of Commerce, representatives from city departments, the Greenwood Shopping Center and Fred Meyer to develop a plan for Greenwood’s Town Center. It was a pro-active approach by the Community Council to develop a vision for new development, and the focus was on things that would make the Town Center more active and pedestrian-friendly, uniting the pedestrian downtown with the more car-friendly shopping center. Consultants were hired to look at the mix of businesses that could be attracted to the area, the urban form and transportation system, and their work was discussed in large public forums. The plan called for new design guidelines (since adopted), mixed use development on the shopping center site, and a walkway or street connection between downtown and the shopping center among other things.

The new Fred Meyer is completed, the first stages of Piper Village are done, a new street connecting Greenwood and the shopping center is shaping up, and the Taproot is getting ready to construct their theatre expansion. So the questions for this meeting is: What still needs to be done to make the Town Center active, walkable and economically healthy? How can the Fred Meyer be an anchor for activity throughout the Town Center that results in a better downtown Greenwood?

The meeting is at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Greenwood Library, 8016 Greenwood Ave. N.

CommentsTags: , , ,

Top Ten Toys, Bartell Drugs moving into Blockbuster Video space

January 3rd, 2013 by Doree

After Blockbuster Video closes later this month, both Top Ten Toys and  Bartell Drugs will be moving and expanding inside the current building.

GreenwoodTownCenter-upstairs-resized

Top Ten Toys is the yellow awning on the left.

Top Ten Toys will first move into the lower level of the building around the end of this month, while construction happens on the current Blockbuster space.

Greenwood Town Center-downstairs-resized

Then, sometime in the fall, the toy store will move back upstairs, into the space where Bartell Drugs is now on the east side of the building, plus another 2,000-square feet into the Blockbuster space. Bartell Drugs will move into the west end of the upstairs.

CommentsTags: , , , ,

Town Center rezone proposal meeting Tuesday

June 28th, 2010 by Doree

Don’t forget that Tuesday night is the meeting on a proposal to rezone certain areas of the Greenwood Town Center. The city’s Department of Planning and Development meeting is from 6-8 p.m. at Phinney Ridge Lutheran Church at 7500 Greenwood Ave. N. For a refresher on just what it’s all about, see our June 8th story.

The rezone proposal would:

  • change the shopping center zoning from commercial to neighborhood commercial
  • the height limit in the shopping center from 40′ to 65′
  • change the zoning on 3rd and 87th from single family to low-rise multifamily
  • change the height limit on 85th from 40′ to 65′

Meeting Agenda:

6:00 – 6:30 p.m. — Meet and Greet

6:30 – 6:45 p.m. — Overview Presentation

6:45 – 8:00 p.m. — Open House/Public Comment

CommentsTags: , ,

Learn more about rezone proposal for Greenwood Town Center

June 8th, 2010 by Doree

The city’s Department of Planning and Development is holding a public meeting on June 29 to discuss the proposed rezoning of the Greenwood Town Center site in the heart of Greenwood. The Town Center includes Fred Meyer, Greenwood Market, Bartell Drugs, Top Ten Toys, Blockbuster, and the new Sedges retail/residential building.

The proposal also includes upzoning some surrounding areas, including about 100 feet deep on the south side of NW 85th Street, west side of NW 3rd Avenue and north side of NW 87th Street.

Trevor Stanley, president of the Greenwood Community Council, says the rezoning proposal came about through community meetings over the last several years. When Fred Meyer proposed to knock down its current store and replace it with a larger, mixed-use project, the GCC and another group, the Greater Greenwood Design & Development Advisory Group (GG.DDAG) found that current zoning in that area was inconsistent and could lead to the wrong kind of projects.

Fred Meyer’s current zoning is C-1 (commercial zoning that encourages large parking lots). The proposal is to change it to NC3-65 (Neighborhood Commercial with a 65-foot height limit), which would encourage taller buildings and a larger footprint, instead of a sea of asphalt parking.

(Fred Meyer’s plan is to demolish its existing store and replace it with a much larger store, along with about 250 apartments and other retail space, plus a large parking garage. The city approved Fred Meyer’s basic design last September.)

Under the proposal, the area just west of 3rd Ave. NW and north of NW 87th Street would be changed to L-3 (Lowrise), which would allow town homes with a height limit of 35 feet. Stanley says this is the same height limit as a single-family home, but the allowable lot coverage would be greater, although buildings could not come right up to the property line.

“It could be good because it could stimulate development along that area, which has had a lot of problems attracting anybody to come in there,” Stanley said. “To date, that area has sat in a sort of derelict state. We want nice stuff there, but it has to be profitable or it won’t be developable.”

The rezone proposal also would change the zoning on the south side of NW 85th Street to NC2P-65, which allows buildings 65 feet tall, but limits the footprints of those buildings.

Stanley says he understands the concerns of homeowners south of NW 85th St. who worry about a tall development being built right next door. But he says since the single family homes there are built partially up the hill, the 65 feet height limit is not as daunting as initially thought.

“Yes, that’s a big building, that’s absolutely right, but there’s another 15 feet of grade up to the top of that hill, plus there’s an alley in between. So you can’t say it’s 65 feet above your house. But, it would be tall,” he said. “It’s just trying to encourage the right thing. And the right thing is…subjective. It needs to be dealt with, it’s just a matter of how we deal with it.”

The now vacant lot of the corner of NW 85th Street and 1st Ave. NW that used to be a Pizza Hut years ago, would be included in the NC2P-65 zoning. We reported last summer that a new restaurant would be going in there, but that apparently fell through. Last week, a trailer with the sign “Hot Bean Espresso” was parked there. (PhinneyWood has been unable to find any business license or building permits with that name. If you have any information, please share it below in comments.)

 

Several months ago, the Greenwood Community Council applied to the Seattle Parks Department’s Opportunity Fund to purchase the site for a park, using money from the 2008 Parks Levy. Stanley said acquiring that site would cost about $1.5 million. While the property owner told Stanley he might be interested in selling that site, he hoped to sell it along with the two adjacent lots (currently an empty lot and an old house) as one big package.

Stanley says an urban park next to the Greenwood Town Center would be a perfect fit. “It’s going to increase the quality of life in general for the Town Center to have a nice little green space,” he said. “It kind of activates that space. And it’s horribly ugly the way it is right now. We want to be proactive to help encourage the right stuff, or else we’re going to get the Hot Bean Espresso stand.”

The DPD zoning meeting is from 6-8 p.m., Tuesday, June 29, in the Fellowship Hall of the Phinney Ridge Lutheran Church, at 7500 Greenwood Ave. N.

CommentsTags: , , ,